Transformative Principal
Discover the secrets of school leadership in this weekly interview podcast with top leaders in education.

Kim Marshall is the founder of the Marshall Memo and Jenn David-Lang is the founder of the Main Idea. We talk about their new book, “The Best of the Marshall Memo,”

  • As a principal I rarely had time to read in a thoughtful way.
  • Why write a book about the Marshall Memo.
  • Articles not organized.
  • Professional development ideas.
  • Educational journals have theme issues.
  • How to take the next step from the learning to the doing.
  • Practical article about how to have conversations - Don’t email criticism
  • Watching a teacher who made a grammatical mistake.
  • It’s going to be in the principal’s hands. One strategy, what do you notice?
  • Why have a conversation about the grammatical error? Are there reasons why you should talk with this teacher?
  • She was miseducating the kids. We couldn’t let that go by.
  • Has the leader created a culture of feedback?
  • Getting into classrooms enough that you see the bigger picture.
  • Teachers need to be appreciated.
  • Real time coaching vs after-the-event feedback.
  • Routine for principals to take over the class.
  • Have a conversation so that the teacher comes to the conclusion on what behavior comes next.
  • Sanebox - take control of your email
  • How to be a transformative principal? Kim: Have an out of office response on email. Jenn: Ask for feedback.
  • If you want to work with Jethro, please get in touch jethrojones.com or schedule a call

Phil Echols is an Administrator of Professional Learning supporting K-12 needs in the area of Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) and coaching in Wake County Public Schools in North Carolina.

  • Psychology major and teacher in his home town.

  • Counseling

  • The power of Twitter.

  • People often find a way to monetize things

  • Monetization of the network. You can’t monetize the network - via @adamcurry

* #BMETalk - Black male educators
* Black males are like unicorns in so many spaces.
* Every time I meet someone face to face at a conference I create a twitter list with them on it.
* How do you mentor those unicorns?
* 100+ staff members. 1200 students.
* Why do you stay here?
* You could be in a school where there are more minority students. Why do you stay here?
* Good things come from my DNA.
* Patience and reflection comes from my parents.
* Enter spaces with the mindset of who do I need to be in this space?
* How to decide who you need to be in a meeting.
* The relationships of the people at the table require a different approach.
* Paying attention to what people might need.
* Presume positive intent.
* Relationships are foundational.
* Sometimes I can be too heavy on the relationship and we don’t get everything done that we need to!
* Facilitated leadership equilateral relationships, processes, and tasks.
* Leader member exchange theory - focuses on three components: leader follower, and exchanges between those two.
* Leaders often have in groups and out groups.
* Out groups don’t always get everything they need.
* Help people feel like they are in the “in group!“
* How to be a transformative principal? Be more mindful of your individual interactions with all of your staff members.

Direct download: Relational_Leadership_with_Phil_Echols_Transformative_Principal_318.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 1:00am MST

Cristina Garza is the director of social impact for the Mission Economic Development Corporation. She curates and leads all STEAM and entrepreneurship initiatives for this EDC, and through this work commits herself improving the financial mobility of area residents, and fostering progressive and equitable economic development practices. Among the programs she founded are Web of Women, an initiative to teach technical skills to women professionals, and Career Readiness and Empowerment of Women (CREW), a multidisciplinary internship that trains young high-school women to serve as leaders in STEM and entrepreneurship. She is  2017 Next City Vanguard and named by CityLab Latino one of the Top 20 Young Civic Leaders of 2017. Before her career in economic development, Cristina worked in several museums in New York City including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Rubin of Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Historical Society, and the Brooklyn Museum. 

  • What prevents the community relationships from having this kind of impact?
  • By the time they leave your school, they are not attractive to industry.
  • Don’t want to give tax incentives just to have them import their talent!
  • It’s not worth it to train someone who doesn’t have the soft skills.
  • There could be better systems where EDC pays for the high schoolers to work somewhere.
  • Challenges with push to early-college schools.
  • You were ready to get out of your hometown.
  • Too scared and insecure to do the real things that I wanted to.
  • Seeing myself as being capable of talking about.
  • Shy away from educational issues that are hard to measure
  • Feeling like we are not good enough.
  • Define what is important.
  • Everyone is measured by their productivity and we are teaching kids that.
  • Reevaluate how much time we are putting in kids’ schedules to think about these issues.
  • Have time in kids’ schedules to go to counseling and go to group therapy.
  • There are only two things that kids do all day in school: Compete or try to get good grades
  • How rare it is for kids to have an opportunity to work on something that is open ended.
  • Hard to ideate because they have never been given a prompt and how to deal with it.
  • Ideas come from spending time thinking.
  • Start the semester with what are the problems you see affecting you and others?
  • Giving kids time to find their own story and their own why
  • They are experts in their lives.
  • Policies should be done in consideration of their voices.
  • The level of complexity that youth today are experiencing.
  • Understanding their power and owning their truth.
  • how to be a transformative principal? Spend at least one hour sending emails to industry leaders asking about how to prepare their kids?

Cristina Garza is the director of social impact for the Mission Economic Development Corporation. She curates and leads all STEAM and entrepreneurship initiatives for this EDC, and through this work commits herself improving the financial mobility of area residents, and fostering progressive and equitable economic development practices. Among the programs she founded are Web of Women, an initiative to teach technical skills to women professionals, and Career Readiness and Empowerment of Women (CREW), a multidisciplinary internship that trains young high-school women to serve as leaders in STEM and entrepreneurship. She is  2017 Next City Vanguard and named by CityLab Latino one of the Top 20 Young Civic Leaders of 2017. Before her career in economic development, Cristina worked in several museums in New York City including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Rubin of Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Historical Society, and the Brooklyn Museum. 

  • CREW is a year-long internship and career preparation program for women and non-binary individuals.
  • Getting mentored by women in industries that don’t exist in this town.
  • I wanted to create a program that I would have benefited from when I was 17
  • They are the first in their families to go to college.
  • Only Latina in the classroom or the workspace.
  • Integration of entrepreneurship and leadership.
  • Thinking about the statistics of women in Tech.
  • Why are we keeping women of color out of these leadership positions?
  • Instead of just putting kids in coding camps, we need to
  • Looking at problems that are affecting their communities, then create products or policies that fix that problem.
  • Jobs are not just for software engineers.
  • Not waiting for someone to tap them on the shoulder and say they are chosen.
  • You create change by doing it.
  • The coding doesn’t happen until the end of the internship so that they have a purpose for the coding.
  • Kids learn way more way faster when they have a problem they are trying to solve.
  • We’re not spending enough time simply talking to youth and seeing how they can solve problems in their communities.
  • You’ve got to create partnerships with the school and community partners.

Sam Brooks is honored to have worked for Putnam County Schools (TN) for the past 27 years. Brooks leads all student/teacher personalized learning opportunities in the district, which includes online, dual enrollment, dual credit, and industry certification options. Mr. Brooks is a Google Certified Trainer and was recognized by the Center for Digital Education as a national Top 30 Technologists, Transformers, Trailblazers in 2014 and his program has been identified in several national publications.

  • Director of Personalized Learning - started as credit options for kids. Now is for so much more.
  • How can we meet the individual needs of each child in the classroom?
  • State level personalized learning.
  • VITAL - virtual instruction to accentuate learning
  • Personalized learning task force.
  • Mimic task force in our own district.
  • Doing a lot with credit recovery.
  • Pockets of innovation.
  • Future Ready - Getting a student to be ready for whatever they want their future to be.
  • I only saw how things affected me as a teacher within my four walls.
  • How to be a transformative principal? Be open minded and take on the mindset of working for the students.

Zachary Hartzman is a high school Economics & English teacher in New York City.

  • Taught many different social studies classes.
  • International and transfer school. 100% immigrant & ELL students.
  • Passionate about videos games.
  • Getting kids to interact with games
  • Florence - great app for relationships.
  • Using games to deal with discussing heavy issues.
  • Whenever I teach one of these lessons, I write a post showing how it went.
  • It’s been really hard to find engaging content that
  • 3 days a week, I teach an ELA course using video games as the main text.
  • Gone Home
  • What Remains of Edith Finch?
  • One student playing while everyone else is talking about the gameplay.
  • Regents exam required for graduation - read a text and identify the central idea, so we use the videos games to focus on those literary events.
  • You have to give them time to learn how to use the controller.
  • Positive outcomes: Whenever I teach with a game, there’s never a head down that day.
  • Expanding the curriculum, but would love to get more science and math.
  • How to be a transformative principal? If a teacher comes to you with a potentially wacky idea, hear them out.

I'd love to work with you! To learn more about working with Jethro, go here.


I've got some exciting news to share with you....

But first, a little context.

The last few months have been pretty exciting.

I've started a student driven learning newsletter in partnership with ASCD.

I spoke at the ReWire conference in New Jersey.

I've been at FETC this week, and have some amazing interviews coming out on the podcast soon.

The podcast is at 600,000 downloads for its six-year anniversary. (click here to get an email each Sunday when it is released!)

I am a New Team Habits Champion!

My wife and I have started coaching families on how to set goals in a family setting! How cool is that?

I'm giving a keynote at a conference in February, more details soon...

And here's the big news:

At the end of this school year I will be leaving Fairbanks and start supporting principals directly full time through the mastermind, speaking, and consulting.

I'm pretty excited about our new adventure, and I hope that I can work with you! If you've got a need for a speaker in the next six months, please reach out.

 

Direct download: 20200118_1244_Jethro_Recording.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 11:12am MST

This is an amazing story of how Kimberly's district set them up for success so they could find time for the important things in life. What a cool and unique approach. 

Kimberly Dixon is principal in Toronto

  • Took a year off to take some coursework.
  • Mother had supported her at the beginning of her career.
  • Lacking balance.
  • Four over 5. Paid 80% over four years then paid 80% for fifth year.
  • Typically accept about a dozen people for that in our district.
  • Became principal and started coursework to become a superintendent at the same time.
  • I realized I had been working really hard so travel was definitely a goal.
  • I had to operate within the parameters of
  • Principal of a summer school program in South Korea, kids met in South Korea and then went to the Philippines.
  • Be present as a mother and take care of myself.
  • The year was very unplanned.
  • School seems very Eurocentric, but our schools are so diverse.
  • Families are always excited
  • The balance needed in life to be your best.
  • Without balance, we run into issues of burnout
  • It’s about putting myself well into the time I have.
  • Not having that rushed approach. Respecting my time when I’m not in school and not “on.”
  • Giving a lot of yourself to other people’s children.
  • Having a purpose for my days.
  • Be in each classroom before every major break in the day.
  • None of my goals could happen unless I built the relationships.
  • No more than one evening event each week.
  • More balanced for my own kids and the kids at school.
  • How to be a transformative principal? I’ve discovered who being me is! Try to center yourself in some way to figure out what makes you peaceful.

Work with Jethro


This is an amazing story of how Kimberly's district set them up for success so they could find time for the important things in life. What a cool and unique approach. 

Kimberly Dixon is principal in Toronto

  • Took a year off to take some coursework.
  • Mother had supported her at the beginning of her career.
  • Lacking balance.
  • Four over 5. Paid 80% over four years then paid 80% for fifth year.
  • Typically accept about a dozen people for that in our district.
  • Became principal and started coursework to become a superintendent at the same time.
  • I realized I had been working really hard so travel was definitely a goal.
  • I had to operate within the parameters of
  • Principal of a summer school program in South Korea, kids met in South Korea and then went to the Philippines.
  • Be present as a mother and take care of myself.
  • The year was very unplanned.
  • School seems very Eurocentric, but our schools are so diverse.
  • Families are always excited
  • The balance needed in life to be your best.
  • Without balance, we run into issues of burnout
  • It’s about putting myself well into the time I have.
  • Not having that rushed approach. Respecting my time when I’m not in school and not “on.”
  • Giving a lot of yourself to other people’s children.
  • Having a purpose for my days.
  • Be in each classroom before every major break in the day.
  • None of my goals could happen unless I built the relationships.
  • No more than one evening event each week.
  • More balanced for my own kids and the kids at school.
  • How to be a transformative principal? I’ve discovered who being me is! Try to center yourself in some way to figure out what makes you peaceful.

Work with Jethro


 

Turner is the principal of Tristate State Christian Academy in Elkton Maryland.

Work with Jethro


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